HTML5 – Part I of ∞

 

HTML5 code sample

I’ve been reading HTML5: Designing Rich Internet Applications and have been thinking.  Never a good thing in my case.  HTML5 has a lot of potential because it exposes new functionality currently being handled by Javascript.  You loose tags that we all been fond of: <font> **, <b>, <marquee>**, <big>, <center>, <etc>* **.  On the other hand you have gained <datagrid>, <input type=”url”>, <input type=”email”>, <div class=”etc”>.  You should have gotten used to using <strong> in lieu of <b>, but we’ll talk about that one-on-one.

This reading has set me on the mission to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the version incremented standard (with no space).  These standards have been shaped by the market forces that make up the governing body of the World Wide Web known as the W3C.  The market reality of these corporations have shaped and guided the development of industry standards for years1.  These corporations are responsible for developing software, lower-level coding standards, and training to build webpages, mobile apps, and other software and hardware that interfacing the public with the World Wide Web.

These standards are the bedrock of the what some term “Web 3.0” or “The Semantic Web”.  On this bedrock developers are creating the platforms and applications enabling humanity to consume information that influences society.  I will be discussing this in the coming weeks, months, and years as developers write code taking advantage of HTML5. All you have to do sit back, grab a frosty beverage and tune in after the break.

* Non-standard
** LOLz
1 World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)

One thought on “HTML5 – Part I of ∞

  1. Hey Craig,

    Interesting post. I added that book to my Amazon wishlist. I’ve been meaning to catch up on HTML 5. I trust you took the time to research comments/reviews <etc /> before purchasing. So; I’ll just piggy-back off of your efforts and claim the benefits.

    From what you’ve seen thus far, in HTML 5, will it be hard to switch back and forth? Meaning after familiarizing myself with the new array of HTML tags, when working on an HTML 4.0.1 site will I end up incorporating HTML 5? Hmm.. now that I think about it, that seems like a loaded question. Oh well; see if you can answer it anyway. 🙂

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